© 2018 by Monash Gallery of Art for LEGACY. Your collection. Our story.

Landscape/Architecture

Central Gallery

 

Exploration and documentation of the landscape and the built environment has occupied the practice of so many photographers. So much of the human condition can be revealed by how we have chosen to inhabit our world.

 

David STEPHENSON

Light cities is one of Stephenson’s more recent series. Drawing on many of the methodologies and preoccupations of his previous work, Light cities involved using long exposures to photograph major cities around the world at night. The series continued themes and ideas common to Stephenson’s practice. For instance, his interests in the landscape, architecture, time and the symbolic nature of light are evident in this project. The long exposures accentuate the vivid colours in the city lights and also serve to eliminate the busyness of cities, as movement is turned into streams of colour and light.

The cities in this series are generally seen from a consistent viewpoint, usually from high vantage points. This, along with the vivid colours and lack of evidence of people and movement in the photographs, serves to create a consistency across each of the images, which suggests something of the relative uniformity of cities in the globalised world. It also eliminates the foreground and allows the viewer to focus on the vast, awe-inspiring masses of light and energy that contemporary cities have become.

Melbourne, looking east from Rialto Tower  2009
from the series Light cities 2008–11
pigment ink-jet print
89.9 x  71.1 cm
Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection
donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program 2016
MGA 2016.110.1
courtesy of the artist

John GOLLINGS

John Gollings (1944– ) made his first photographs and received darkroom tuition at age 11. He later studied architecture at the University of Melbourne and completed a Masters in Architecture at RMIT. He worked as a freelance advertising photographer, specialising in fashion and, as his contemporaries in architecture developed their practices, he increasingly focused on architectural photography. Gollings is now a well-known architectural photographer. He has also lectured on architecture and photography and has recently spent more time on longer term projects with academic or cultural significance for books, exhibitions and fine prints, including the documentation of dead cities in countries such as India, Cambodia and Libya.

He was the subject of a survey exhibition John Gollings: the history of the built world, at MGA 2017-18.

Suburban aerial, Cheltenham, S 037 54 10.45 E 145 05 20.52 elev 462M  2013
pigment ink-jet print
55.5 x 83.2 cm
Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection
donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by John Gollings 2016
MGA 2016.118
courtesy of the artist

Kenneth PLEBAN

PHQ – Russell Street, D24  1997

chromogenic print

86.3 x 130.0 cm

Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection

donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by Daniel Palmer 2016

MGA 2017.04

Arthur WICKS

Solstice note #9 – Berlin  2002

pigment ink-jet print

88.0 x 86.0 cm

Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection

donated by the artist 2006

MGA 2006.23

courtesy of the artist

Andrew BROWNE

Light effect #10  2004
chromogenic print
72.0 x 72.0 cm
Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection
donated by the artist through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program 2005
MGA 2006.11.10
courtesy of the artist

Peter DOMBROVSKIS

This photograph shows a myrtle tree at Mount Anne in Tasmania’s south-west. This image is typical of Peter Dombrovskis’s practice in that it shows a remote part of the Tasmanian landscape. His images were often produced with the intention of drawing viewers’ attention to the beauty of Tasmania’s wilderness. Like other photographs by Dombrovskis this image has an unreal quality about it, as if it were a part of a surreal fantasy land. This inspires a sense of wonder and awe in the viewer and is one of the reasons Dombrovskis’s photographs have played a part in preserving various Tasmanian natural places.

Myrtle tree in rainforest at Mount Anne, south-west Tasmania  1984
pigment ink-jet print
94.2 x 74.1 cm
Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection
donated by the Estate of Peter Dombrovski 2015
MGA 2015.039
courtesy of the Estate of Peter Dombrovskis

Alfred GREGORY

Crevasse in Western Cwm  1953

from the series Everest first ascent 1953

gelatin silver print

47.0 x 46.5 cm

Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection

donated by the artist through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program 2006

MGA 2006.16

Stephen WICKHAM

Image for Georg Weisz  2004

chromogenic print

103.0 x 101.0 cm

Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection

donated by the artist 2004

MGA 2004.30

2015046.jpg

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Alberto SANCHEZ

King of the castle #1  201213

from the series Beyond the black stump

hand-coloured pigment ink-jet print

58.5 x 58.8 cm

Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection

donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gift Program by Joy Hirst 2015

MGA 2015.046

courtesy of the artist and Retrospect Galleries (Byron Bay)